What I do differently with my genre?

To compliment Fiction Friday, I have compiled a long old list of theme ideas for platform building blog posts.

This collection I think of as the Business Monday Platform Builder Prompt.

What I do differently with my genre?

This is an area that a lot of writers fail to address and we do so at our own cost. In business, we talk about the USP – Unique selling proposition. Your USP is the reason why someone should come to you rather than anyone else.

As writers, we are not also naturally attuned to thinking about what we do differently. Howeve5r, what we do that is unique or special is part of the character of our writing and the kind of stories only we can tell.

Each writer has a story that only they can tell. Give the same plot, characters, setting, and chapter notes to another writer and you will get a different story.

Reflecting on your uniqueness is as important for you as a writer as it is for the reader who might be looking for exactly what you offer.

What is your genre?

Of course, to be able to know how you set yourself apart in your genre, you must first know what the genre is.

Rock your Writing gives a great guide to figuring this issue out. I would certainly give that article a read if you are struggling to identify which genre your multi-genre break-out novel sits in.

For example, for all the urban fantasy elements I cram into some stories I know that they are actually soft sci-fi while others, despite the science bits are really science fiction. One with both is actually a coming of age story about childhood. The magic is secondary to that.

  1. Step one, know your genre.
  2. Step two, figure out what you do differently.
  3. Step three, write about it.

Let us know how you get on. For most platforms, linking to this post will ping it and make a link back to your post. Then we can all come and read what you have written. I look forward to checking out your platforms and your reflections of what you do differently.

Write well.

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My Genre: Winners

As I think I might have mentioned, I have struggled to choose one winner this week. At last, I think I have picked one but it was not at all easy.

The theme was why I write in my genre – a question that not all professionals can answer. You each approached the theme in a different way and I was deeply impressed with each and every post I read. You are a very talented bunch.

The participants

Below I have listed all the posts that I found. If yours is not here then I did not find it. I checked the pings & comments, the regulars, and the Facebook group. Only four of you commented a link or pinged the blog I awarded you four non-countable bonus points which are only redeemable for bragging rights. (If you need help linking).

Up to this point, there have always been seven or eight of you but some of you took a week off. At least I hope you did because I would feel terrible if I missed anyone out.

Now for the winners. Drum roll, please.

Best Comment and Most Comments

Jess Joy was the runaway winner this week in terms of comment count. Posting something fun and easy to engage with can do wonders for getting comments going. This is a great platform building technique in and of itself.

The most commented post was also the home of some amazing comments. Many of the comments mimicked the style of the post and it looks like you all had a lot of fun with it. So I am awarding Ansteysp the best comment prize.

Best Post

This week I am awarding the prize to Artimis Blake’s “Why do I write in my Genre”. While every single last post was a contender for the prize, for different reasons this post spoke to me where I live. This is purely chance, I think, but as I have to choose just one and it was so very, very close…

From a platform building perspective, this post is very good content because it is something fans and the press can quote easily.

Over to you

Feel free to heap likes, comments, praise, and general congratulations to our winners.

There is no right or wrong answer here, who would you choose as the winner from this set?

Why I write in my genre

Here is this week’s theme for the writing competition that also builds your author platform. For full details please see week one’s post.

Week Four: Competition Theme

This is the theme for this week. Closing date to have posted it online is midnight on Monday the 27th.

Why I write in my genre

You can write anything you want that fits that theme. As little or as much as you feel you need to. Bonus points (which don’t count towards anything other than enhanced bragging rights) if you can include both the original Greek classification system and the art history usage of Genre Paintings without it seemingly the least bit forced.

Ideas

This theme was designed to give you an opportunity to share your love of your preferred genre (or genres) with your readers. Talking about the general classification of your work can help you show up on the radar of the type of people that want to read that sort of work. However, feel free to argue that genres are a terrible idea, and show why your genre-busting novel is amazing without them. Or, you know, find some awesome way to spin a fiction around the theme. It’s your blog after all

However, feel free to argue that genres are a terrible idea, and show why your genre-busting novel is amazing without them. Or, you know, find some awesome way to spin a fiction around the theme. It’s your blog after all.

You can probably guess my favourite genre from the picture I chose this week. It was that or an image of zombies.

Don’t forget

Don’t forget to link to this week’s post so your entry is (much) easier to discover. You may find it easier to get more comments if you also share your post to your Facebook friends or on Twitter. There is now a guide to linking (and link sharing), if you need it.