What I do differently with my genre?

To compliment Fiction Friday, I have compiled a long old list of theme ideas for platform building blog posts.

This collection I think of as the Business Monday Platform Builder Prompt.

What I do differently with my genre?

This is an area that a lot of writers fail to address and we do so at our own cost. In business, we talk about the USP – Unique selling proposition. Your USP is the reason why someone should come to you rather than anyone else.

As writers, we are not also naturally attuned to thinking about what we do differently. Howeve5r, what we do that is unique or special is part of the character of our writing and the kind of stories only we can tell.

Each writer has a story that only they can tell. Give the same plot, characters, setting, and chapter notes to another writer and you will get a different story.

Reflecting on your uniqueness is as important for you as a writer as it is for the reader who might be looking for exactly what you offer.

What is your genre?

Of course, to be able to know how you set yourself apart in your genre, you must first know what the genre is.

Rock your Writing gives a great guide to figuring this issue out. I would certainly give that article a read if you are struggling to identify which genre your multi-genre break-out novel sits in.

For example, for all the urban fantasy elements I cram into some stories I know that they are actually soft sci-fi while others, despite the science bits are really science fiction. One with both is actually a coming of age story about childhood. The magic is secondary to that.

  1. Step one, know your genre.
  2. Step two, figure out what you do differently.
  3. Step three, write about it.

Let us know how you get on. For most platforms, linking to this post will ping it and make a link back to your post. Then we can all come and read what you have written. I look forward to checking out your platforms and your reflections of what you do differently.

Write well.

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Now we are a charity

Yesterday evening a number of our regulars and other supporters gathered to progress Thanet Creative Writers from an Unincorporated Association into an Unincorporated Charitable Association.

On the surface, this might not seem like much of a big deal but this is the end result of months of planning and a high point we have been aiming towards for a long time. Despite cyber-bullies, baseless legal threats (from said bully), and general unpleasantness from what is likely a single individual in need of a hug, we joyfully saw a project that has run for the last four years become something more.

The formal signing of the Constitution saw the first seven members added to the charity and this was followed by the acceptance of five trustees including the three officers.

  • Mr M. Brown (that’s me) was unanimously elected Chair
  • Mrs L. Winder was unanimously elected Secretary
  • Mr D. Clemence was unanimously elected Treasurer
  • Mr A. Winder was unanimously elected as a trustee
  • Miss D. Gifford was unanimously elected as a trustee

Membership of the charity is not required for coming to our events. However, sponsorship by a member and a donation of at least a pound to show you mean it is required to be a member.

It is safe to say that we are hugely thrilled by this new chapter in our community’s history. Not least of all because now the community truly can be owned by the members and I can stop saying “this group is all about you, not me” because now there is a huge constitution that says so with a lot of words.

Those who expressed an interest in being a trustee, (but not just now), or expressed an interest but did not follow through by giving us your details in time, we will be holding an AGM at roughly this time next year and that would be the ideal time to step up if you still want to.

I am rather hoping that some of our newly minted trustees will feel the inkling to post here too. I am sure that you will grow tired of hearing from me soon enough. Until then, I hope that you will join me in congratulating our new committee and the members that made it all possible.

Charity Trustees

Thanet Creative writers are soon to become a charity. As part of that transition, we will be appointing trustees.

Trustees are an important part of a charity. A good selection of trustees can make a huge difference. A good board can help turbo charge the effectiveness of a charity.

According to reachskills.org.uk:

At its heart, being a trustee puts you at the centre of the action for the organisation you are involved in. The more effective the board of trustees, the greater difference you and your organisation will make.

If you feel like reading some more Ian Joseph from Trustees Unlimited offers advice on the questions trustees must ask to ensure they are fully aware of what they are getting into.

How much time will it take?

The amount of time it takes being a trustee differs from one charity to another. For Thanet Creative Writers you will probably be looking at a few hours a month, usually on one evening.

What are my responsibilities?

The trustees act on behalf of the chairty. In the case of Thanet Creative Writers the board literally reprisents the interests of all the members. In practice though, your repsonsibilities may be limited to asking the difficult questions and voting fairly.

Some trustees may be asked to hold items or money in trust (thus the name) as the charity will not be able to own them itself. Again, in practice this is not likely to make much difference to you as we will be setting up a seperate group bank account when and if we have a surplus of spare cash.

Chairty Commision Trustee guide has more details.

One more thing – It is you duty to speak up if you disagree. If you disagree with a decission the board makes then you need to go on record as objecting. If you are in the meeting it can be as simple as saying I’d like to go on the record as disagreeing.

It might seem quite minor, but it can be very improtant that the records ofthe charity reflect if a choice was unanimouse or if there were other ideas.

However, most boards try to reach full agreement on issues, if they possibly can.

Who can be a trustee?

Pretty much anyone can be a trustee. Unless you are bankrupt or were recently found guilty of fraud.

For Thanet Creative Writers, you need to be a member which means applying to become a member or being there on Thursday as we transition into a charity – in which case you are automatically a member. You can read more here

Take a look at the TCW Tustee Nomination Form if you would like to stand for election as a trustee. But be quick the forms need to be returned by the end of Wednesday.

Getting a good literary agent

Getting published is not easy. Getting a literary agent helps but getting an agent is no small task.

For example, 5 Easy Ways to Keep Your Work from Ending Up in an Agent’s Trash” by Bethany Cadman (author of Doctor Vanilla’s Sunflowers) lists not following the submission guidelines, poor spelling, and bad query letters among the reasons writers get rejected.

Assuming that you avoid the common mistakes here is a selection of advice from writers about getting a good literary agent.

Keep reading “Getting a good literary agent” on our new website.